Moon

new.jpgfirst_quarter.jpgwaxing_gibbous.jpgfull.jpgwaning_gibbous.jpglast_quarter.jpgwaning_crescent.jpg
Sequence:
1. New Moon.
2. Waxing Crescent.
3. First Quarter.
4. Waxing Gibbous.
5. Full Moon.
6. Waning Gibbous.
7. Last Quarter.
8. Waning Crescent.

The phases of the moon are caused by the relative positions of the earth, sun, and moon. The moon goes around the earth, on average, in 27 days 7 hours 43 minutes. The sun always illuminates the half of the moon facing the sun (except during lunar eclipses, when the moon passes thru the earth’s shadow). When the sun and moon are on opposite sides of the earth, the moon appears “full” to us, a bright, round disk. When the moon is between the earth and the sun, it appears dark, a “new” moon. In between, the moon’s illuminated surface appears to grow (wax) to full, then decreases (wanes) to the next new moon. The edge of the shadow (the terminator) is always curved, being an oblique view of a circle, giving the moon its familiar crescent shape. Because the “horns” of the moon at the ends of the crescent are always facing away from the setting or rising sun, they always point upward in the sky. It is fun to watch for paintings and pictures which show an “impossible moon” with the horns pointed downwards.Images & Contents Credit : NASA

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: